New “Game Of Thrones” season brings dragons, threats and gore

It’s been a long, long time.

HBO’s hit show “Game of Thrones” returned for its third season March 31 after more than nine months since the second season’s finale.

The first episode drew in record numbers for the series — 6.7 million total viewers on the night of its third season premiere.

It also broke records for piracy. More than 1 million people pirated the episode the day after it aired. At one point, 163,000 people were viewing one torrent at once, which broke the former all-time record, according to CNN.

And after having seen the wonder that was the third season premiere, these numbers aren’t surprising. In this episode, viewers caught up with the majority of the main characters in the increasingly complicated plot.

To summarize: the Lannisters are still plotting against and hating everyone, Stannis Baratheon is still the dullest part of the show, Robb Stark still looks mighty fine in armor, and Jon Snow is still cold. Oh, and there are dragons — big, flying dragons.

As with any first episode of the season, it had a gratuitous amount of conversation, but lordy, were some of these conversations amazing. Most notably, the exchange between father and son Tywin and Tyrion Lannister was a pinnacle of how unbelievably cold some characters can be. It provided a look at the family dysfunction yet to come in the season.

This episode also contained one of the most disturbingly gory scenes thus far in the show: nipple, meet knife.

Overall, the third season started off unbelievably strong, especially for the first episode. Yes there was talk but no idle, unnecessary chatter was present. After counting down to this season for so long, I was prepared for a letdown — but, nay, I say. Nay.

I can’t wait until next Sunday.

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Nikki Work

Nikki Work

Nikki Work is the Managing Editor at The Metropolitan. She has contributed to The Metropolitan as a reporter since 2011. She is majoring in journalism with a minor in political science and expects to graduate in 2014. From a young age, Nikki dreamed of a career in journalism and eventually hopes to work for in political reporting and analysis for a large news magazine.
Nikki Work

Nikki Work is the Managing Editor at The Metropolitan. She has contributed to The Metropolitan as a reporter since 2011. She is majoring in journalism with a minor in political science and expects to graduate in 2014. From a young age, Nikki dreamed of a career in journalism and eventually hopes to work for in political reporting and analysis for a large news magazine.

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